Guided sessions for classes 3-4

Animal-human relationship

Domestic animals – livestock – farm animals

What differentiates domestic animals, farm animals and wildlife from each other? Why do humans keep animals and how has this changed over time? What are the wild variants of our farm animals or domestic animals? Our tour mostly takes place outdoors to clarify these and other questions. We also visit the petting zoo where pupils are allowed to feed the farm animals. An independent study phase is scheduled for groups from Class 4 or higher – so please bring pens and paper with you.

Subject area:

  • Exploiting natural phenomena
  • Identifying animals and their typical characteristics

Adapting to habitats

Monkeys, as they truly are!

Monkeys enjoy a lot of popularity with people, yet they often become too humanised and are even regarded as clowns. We try dispel prejudices by getting the pupils to describe the characteristics and behaviour of the various species of monkeys using their own observations.

Subject area:

  • Exploiting natural phenomena
  • Identifying animals and their typical characteristics

Are we all predators?

Not only tigers, lions & co. are predators. Bears, seals and even meerkats also belong to this order. The pupils lean to differentiate between carnivores and predators. To answer the question of why meat eaters are not the same as predators, we not only clarify which animals belong to the order of predators and which are only exclusively meat-eating carnivores, but we also learn how we can recognise them.

Subject area:

  • Exploiting natural phenomena
  • Identifying animals and their typical characteristics

Selected animal species

Pachyderms

Do all pachyderms really have thick skin? Where does the name come from? Which animal species can be classified as 'pachyderms'? Do they have any other similarities except the skin and the colouring? We consider and compare the body structure, the lifestyle and spread of these popular zoo animals and thereby clarify the actual degrees of the relationship between them.

Subject area:

  • Exploiting natural phenomena
  • Exploring and documenting the adaptedness of an animal to its habitat

Adapting to life in the water

Animals have had to adapt to habitats in the water in different ways. How exactly does life differ on land than it does in the water? Using examples such as seals, hippos and penguins, we methodically work out the various adaptive capacities of each species to the water either on tour or as part of group work.

Subject area:

  • Exploiting natural phenomena
  • Exploring and documenting the adaptedness of an animal to its habitat

Polar excursion to the penguins

Do penguins only come from the Antarctic or can they be found in other parts of the world? We visit different penguin species and compare their different habitats and lifestyles with each other. The pupils can explore the anatomical specialisations of the penguins as well as their skills on land and in water.

Subject area:

  • Exploiting natural phenomena
  • Exploring and documenting the adaptedness of an animal to its habitat

Adapting to seasons

The winter zoo tour

The Berlin winter can indeed be rather unpleasant for us humans. How do the zoo animals, which come from completely different climatic regions from around the world, endure the low temperatures and what do the European animals do? The pupils learn the methods on how the animals combat the cold, such as hibernating, remaining dormant and going into torpor. Please bring appropriate clothing yourselves as we don't want you to freeze!

Subject area:

  • Temporal processes in nature
  • Explaining seasons and unlocking natural phenomena
  • Exploring and documenting the adaptedness of an animal to its habitat

On the go with the research team

Why do animals have tails?

Only a superficial attachment or an important part of the body? What purpose does an animal's tail actually serve? Why has this completely disappeared in some animals? As we consider the diversity of tail bearing animals, we deal with the original function of the tail and its alternate functions as a tool to support, balance, communicate etc.

Subject area:

  • Exploiting natural phenomena
  • Learning how to observe
  • Understanding functions

Questions upon questions

This exciting, interactive tour through the zoo is particularly well suited for school trips. There are a lot of questions and conundrums to be solved. The pupils can test their knowledge and obtain new knowledge through observations and with playful activities. Depending on your requirements, the tour can be tailored in advance thematically or oriented towards selected animal species or groups.

Subject area:

  • Exploiting natural phenomena
  • Exploring and documenting the adaptedness of an animal to its habitat

Booking

How

  • Appointment by telephone and further information from Zoo Berlin Tel. 030 25 40 1 400
  • You are also welcome to write us an email: zooschule@noSpamzoo-berlin.de
  • No booking without prior arrangement possible
  • Please leave your phone number so we can call you back

Telephone times:

Monday10 a.m.–3 p.m.
Tuesday12 p.m.–4 p.m.
Wednesday10 a.m.–3 p.m.
Thursday12 p.m.–4 p.m.

What do you have to specify?

School, school type and specificities of the class, school year, class size, point of contact, a telephone number or your email address as well as your desired topic, if available. Make sure to let us know when booking, whether your guided session should be treated as part of a field day, or as a supplement to a lesson. Please prepare the pupils accordingly beforehand so that the visit to the Zoo is a great success. It is them that make a major contribution to the success of the event, even during the guided sessions.

Costs

Schools in Berlin: Entry into the Zoo EUR 4.50 per pupil

External schools (not based in Berlin): Entry into the Zoo EUR 7.00 per pupil

One accompanying adult gets free entry for up to 15 pupils, two adults enjoy this privilege from 16 pupils. Please bring along an authorisation from the school with you.

Tours cost 40€ and take about 75 to 90 minutes, depending on the children’s attention span.

Behavioral observation-tours cost 60€ and take about 180 minutes, depending on the children’s attention span